The Volvo VNR Electric trucks will be integrated into NFI's commercial operations, demonstrating the ability for battery-electric trucks to successfully transport goods under a variety of operating conditions. - Photo: Volvo Trucks North America

The Volvo VNR Electric trucks will be integrated into NFI’s commercial operations, demonstrating the ability for battery-electric trucks to successfully transport goods under a variety of operating conditions.

Photo: Volvo Trucks North America


NFI recently became the third fleet to pilot Volvo Trucks North America’s VNR Electric truck as part of the Volvo LIGHTS (Low Impact Green Heavy Transport Solutions) project.

The new pair of battery-electric trucks will join NFI’s fleet of more than 4,500 heavy-duty tractors as part of its dedicated transportation and port drayage services in Southern California.

“As the future of goods movement in the U.S. changes from more of a long-haul operation to regional and hub and spoke models, not only is that NFI’s wheelhouse, it’s an ideal scenario to immerse electrification into our regional hauling strategy,” said Jim O’Leary, vice president, assets/fleet services, NFI Industries.

An EPA SmartWay Partner, NFI has added a number of clean vehicles and equipment to reduce its overall emissions, including electric heavy-duty trucks, natural gas vehicles, and battery-electric warehouse equipment.

“By participating in the Volvo LIGHTS project, NFI is helping to prove that Volvo’s VNR Electric trucks can handle the daily rigors of freight movement. NFI continues to be a leader in sustainability and it comes across in everything they do,” said Peter Voorhoeve, president of Volvo Trucks North America.

Previously, Volvo partnered with TEC Equipment dealership in Fontana, California, and Ontario, California’s Dependable Highway Express for the Volvo LIGHTS project, which is part of California Climate Investments, a statewide initiative that puts billions of Cap-and-Trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy and improving public health and the environment—particularly in disadvantaged communities.





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